About your Search

20110719
20110719
STATION
CNN 7
CNNW 7
MSNBC 2
MSNBCW 2
KQED (PBS) 1
WETA 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 27
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
to it is the corruption allegations at scotland yard, the police agency. we're starting today's testimony with the police. >> reporter: that's right. two of the top cops in the country, former metropolitan police commissioner already resigned and then john yates in charge of the phone hacking investigation review he too resigned yesterday. this is how far the scandal has gone. it cast a shadow over scotland yard and everyone now especially lawmakers are trying to get to the bottom of just how much corruption was there, how cozy was the relationship between news of the world and scotland yard. >> it's going to have implications for david cameron's government. andy coleson is being alleged to have known about this when he was heading up the newspaper. >> reporter: this goes to show how it goes to the very hard of politics here basically andy was the chief spin doctor for prime minister david cameron so this is a major embarrassment for him and it's so bad that he's coming back to england early from his trip to south africa specifically to address these phone hacking allegations at a special day of parliame
like robots in a transformer movie. the top two officials resign from scotland yard and david cameron cuts short a foreign trip as calls for his resignation appear in the british press. now, most disturbingly, sean hoare, one two of the whistle-blowing journalists that brought it to light was found dead in his home. rebecca brooks was arrested this weekend after resigning as ceo of news corp. she is expected to testify tomorrow. this is not her first time appearing before parliament, the clip i'm showing you is from 2003. watch closely. brooks testifying with andy coulson. coulson went on to become david cameron's spokesman and has since resigned and has been arrested in the scandal. >> can i ask, the one element if you ever pay the bliss for information? >> we have paid police for information in the past, and it's been -- >> will you do it in the put? >> it depends on -- >> within the code and within the law, there is a clear public interest and the same holds for private detectives, subterfuge. >> it's illegal for police officers to receive payments. >> no, no, no. i just said withi
suggests that you were present at a meeting with scotland yard when police officers conducted a murder investigation providing you with evidence that your newspaper was interfering with the pursuit of justice. he mentioned alex marancak, and a member of the metropolitan police. can you tell us more about that meet stph-g. >> i can tell you something about it, but i was asked to recall a meeting that i'd had at scotland yard in 2002, and i had -- i was asked recently i think by channel 4 if that story was referring to my information. and my recollection of that meeting was entirely different. my recollection of the meeting was on a completely different subject. and so i'm only going on what i was told by channel 4. they say it's a meeting in november that i had, that was what was put to me. i checked my diary as much as possible and there was no meeting in november. however, there was a subsequent meeting in very early january. it may be that it was that meeting. that was not my recollection of the meeting. but on the other hand because of the sarah's law campaign i did have some pretty
on this issue, and of course, scotland yard has been tainted by this with the top cops in the country now resigning. people are wondering just how far does this scandal, does the corruption go? >> okay, atia shubert joining us live from westminster, many thanks for that, atika will also be on the show later on to give us more insight into what we can expect and what the consequences of what's going to be said today will be. manisha? >> also nina you mentioned earlier how the stock price has been affected. we've been tracking the slump in news corp stock in the wake of the hacking allegations. news corp shares actually closed up by just over 2.5%. in australia today, that reprieve coming after a two-year low on monday and as bloomberg reports that news corp is considering replacing rupert murdoch with coo chase caray. the company dismissed speculation that murdoch may step down. as for news corp's u.s. shares they sank to a six-month low monday dropping another 5% and the company's loss more than $8 billion in market value in the past two weeks alone. july 5th, which was when those allegat
of scotland yard-- sir paul stephenson-- also denied wrongdoing. he said he was embarrassed that he'd hired a former "news of the world" executive, neil wallis, as a public relations consultant. wallis has now been arrested. >> i had no reason to connect wallis with phone hacking. i had no reason to doubt his impropriety. nothing had come to my attention. i had no knowledge of the previous inquiry, and i had no reason to enquire of the previous inquiry, and i had been given assurances by a senior grade chief constable that actually there was nothing new. >> brown: away from the hearings, scotland yard announced today it found no outside involvement in the death of sean hoare, a former "news of the world" reporter who'd been an early whistleblower in the scandal. hoare was found dead monday at his home north of london. more now on today's hearings and the murdoch media empire. we're joined, from london, by john burns of "the new york times," and from new york, by david folkenflik, who covers the media for npr. so, john burns, what struck you most about the murdoch's message today? >> well, i
the beginning, too. much of the investigation has focused on how cozy this relationship was between scotland yard -- >> do you guys want us to stick around? >> stevenson, the scotland yard chief who has resigned said he's embarrassed by the fact he hired neil wallace to be a media consultant. >> i should say in terms of news for american audience there were some very strong denials here by both from rupert and james murdoch that there was any evidence that 9/11 victims in the united states had their phones hacked. that's important because that's what the fbi is investigating. that is probably the most serious allegation relating to news corp. in the united states that's out there and they couldn't be more emphatic that they've seen no evidence of that and they have no evidence of that. now, again, they've made some pretty strong denials in the past. we'll have to wait and see this play out. but it is worth noting that on that front in familiar they were pretty emphatic. the other point and michelle referred to this is, you know, rupert murdoch was asked point-blank, do you intend to resign a
that you were present at a meeting with scotland yard when police officers provided you with evidence that your newspaper was interfering with justice. he particularly mentions the name of another senior executive and at the meeting a man from metropolitan police, that "news of the world" were guilty of interference and attempt to credit -- discredit a police officer and his wife. can you tell us more about that meeting? >> well, i can tell you something about it but it's -- i was asked to recall a meeting that i had at scotland yard in 2002. i was asked recently, i think by channel 4, about the story you're referring to. my information -- my recollection of that meeting was entirely different. my recollection of the meeting was on a completely different subject so i'm only going on what i was told by channel 4. they say it's a meeting in november but that's what was put to me. i checked my diary as much as possible and there was no meeting in november. however, there was a subsequent meeting and in very early january, so it may be that it was that meeting. that was not my recollectio
. >> absolutely. scotland yard has been embarrassed by the whole situation. scotland yard is taking a very aggressive tactic addressing rebekah brooke. they are getting involve and they not only sounded like they didn't run their newspapers, they sound like they didn't even head their newspapers. anyone who read news of the world or the sun could tell that there were hacked voice mails in there and they had no idea they didn't have the proof. >> give us perspective he was passionate about newspapers. >> sure. this was the best selling newspaper in britain a lot of people and analysts within news corp. said why don't we get rid of the non-money makers and other media venchers. murdoch is an old newspaper man and that's how we came up. he has a sentimental attachment to the papers and when it comes to this side of the atlantic where he keeps the new york post and loses a lot of money and has a lot of influence in new york and nationally, it's because it's part of his power base. that paper and other outlets provide coverage to people who she sympathetic to. not as people who are on the other
: the police out of scotland yard have been in the crosshairs. amy kellogg is live in london beginning our coverage there. >> reporter: when the murdochs testify they are obliged to answer questions quote by their honor. a lot of people are saying because this meeting before a parliamentary committee and judge-led and police-led inquiries, the panel must prove this is not just a piece of political theater. there has been immense media interest. cameras were out as james murdoch left his home to go to news international offices and snappers chased rupert murdoch as he left his home. they will answer questions for an hour. and that's starting in half-hour. then rebekah brooks who used to run murdoch's british newspaper empire until last week will answer questions. a limited number of the public are being allowed in. people were lined up at 7:00 a.m. and the line stretched around the block trying to get a seat. the police are still also under allegation of corruption. this story has so many 10 kals, many threads of inquiry even as it involves police involvement. a news of the word reporter wa
volume of information that was extremely useful to scotland yard and in return mr. philbeck received information from the police computer -- >> well, i don't know about that, and most journalists who work as a crime editor or a crime correspondents have a working relationship with that their particular police force. >> when our report was published in early 2010, was when you were chief executive of "news international" and there was certain things where obviously we, a reporter we have found that the evidence from the people of "news international" was wholly unsatisfactory and the amnesia and inconceivable that clyde was a rogue reporter as have been passed on to us, and that we referred to the neville e-mail in there, and awe -- all of that kind of stuff, and when you were chief executive of "news international" at the time that the report was published, did you read the report? >> yes, i did. i'm not saying i read every single word of it, but i read a large majority of it and i particularly read the criticisms addressed to the company, and i can only hope that from the evidence t
is the incompetence of scotland yard. the head of scotland yard has left, the deputy to scotland yard has left and the incompetence of london's authorities was very much on display in that hearing room. there are only 50 seats in that room. that's not wembley stadium or yankee stadium. that is a small room. the idea that the authorities there could not keep an assault and that's what this was, an assault, from taking place is just completely outrageous and the people who run parliament security ought to be absolutely ashamed of themselves. >> you mentioned this isn't wembley stadium but the man in custody getting his face wiped by the police looks like he was attending a sporting event. certainly stood out from the suits and the business attire that we saw. we know from our producer in the room that this man came from the back of the room, had a bag, opened up the bag. this all taking place while everybody watched. it seems inconceivable that that could happen. >> you know, all of us in the united states are unhappily used to going through metal detectors, having people check our belongings, b
hired by both 10 downing street and scotland yard. those decisions taking their toll at the top. >> i wish we had -- involvement in this affair differently. i didn't and that is that. >> reporter: rupert murdoch, his son james, and rebekah brooks, the chain of command over the tabloid embroiled by scandal for almost a decade. today, they are called before parliament. >> this isn't a man who doesn't mow what is going on. everybody is scared to death to do anything that he doesn't like so he's the spider in the middle of this web. >> yes, he did apologize many times. i don't think somebody could have held their hands -- head in their hands so many times and say they are they were sorry. >> reporter: an apology, even answers. it may not be enough. ♪ good afternoon to you! it is just after 2:30 in the afternoon. 9:30 on the eastern seaboard. this is an important day in british history in the british parliamentary life and for the media industry, not only in the united kingdom but around the world. the day when rupert murdoch and his son and his former editor go before a parliamentary se
stated, has established a group to cooperate fully with the police and scotland yard. a police agency that is not absent its own issues. the top two police officers in london have since resigned. now we are awaiting rebekah brooks, a long-time executive with news corporation, the parent company of the fox news channel. brooks ran the tabloid "news of the world" when the hacking occurred some six to eight years ago. she has since resigned her position with the company last friday. as we await on ms. brooks, shares of news corporation, rather, are trading on wall street. they're up 5% during the testimony of the past three hours. our coverage continues from london. and also with happ being now. -- "happening now." our colleagues to follow us. after this commercial break. i'm bill hemmer in new york. diabetes testing? it's all the same. nothing changes. then try this. freestyle lite® blood glucose test strip. sure, but it's not gonna-- [beep] wow. yep, that's the patented freestyle zipwik™ design. did it just-- [both] target the blood? yeah, drew it right in. the test starts fast. you
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)